Playing devil's ad-vocate

Google has made a fortune on providing simple solutions to a variety of problems – not the least of which includes no-brainer contextual advertising through its AdSense offering. But how effective is it, really? Since Google is a universally recognized brand, lots of people trying to make a quick buck look to them first to boost their online presence. They are willing to pay Google to include their company in Google’s AdSense product, which allows site owners to make money by allowing Google to display ads based upon the context of their site’s content.

Google has made a fortune on providing simple solutions to a variety of problems – not the least of which includes no-brainer contextual advertising through its AdSense offering.

But how effective is it, really?

Since Google is a universally recognized brand, lots of people trying to make a quick buck look to them first to boost their online presence.

They are willing to pay Google to include their company in Google’s AdSense product, which allows site owners to make money by allowing Google to display ads based upon the context of their site’s content.

The end result is something like throwing a kegger in college.

A couple people show up that you know and trust, but it’s hard to find them amongst the people you don’t.

So imagine plucking three or four people at random out of that mix…how likely is it that you will know one of these people, or build a relationship with one?

Additionally, most of Google’s ads have a very basic, distinct look to them.

You know it’s a Google ad block before you read any of its contents.

This detracts from meaningful views since people are instantly turned off by knowing it’s “just another ad”, thus negatively impacting click-throughs.

Ads are exponentially more effective when they are entertaining, creative, or hand-selected – so spending a few more bucks on getting your message across will likely pay larger dividends in the end.

More on Google’s return to orbit here.

Dave Leonard