World Bank Open API Data: Now in Google Search Results

Earlier this year we blogged about a new Open API launch, which Phase2 built for The World Bank. The Open API allows third-party developers and organizations to freely query World Bank's largest dataset containing world economic and business indicators and create all kinds of interesting mash-ups.

Irakli Nadareishvili
#Drupal | Posted

Earlier this year we blogged about a new Open API launch, which Phase2 built for The World Bank. The Open API allows third-party developers and organizations to freely query World Bank's largest dataset containing world economic and business indicators and create all kinds of interesting mash-ups.

Today, Google announced the addition of the API data to its search results. With this update, it's now possible to use simple Google searches to tap into the wealth of the data, without the use of any complicated technical tools. You can search for user-friendly keywords like "energy use in china" or "GDP of India" or even "internet users in the united states" and at the top of the search results you will get a cool graph and a short data blurb linking to more detailed information.

Initially Google brings 17 World Development Indicators to the convenience of keyword-based searching: CO2 emissions per capita, Electricity consumption per capita, Energy use per capita, Exports as percentage of GDP, Fertility rate, GDP deflator change, GDP growth rate, GNI per capita in PPP dollars, Gross Domestic Product, Gross National Income in PPP dollars, Imports as percentage of GDP, Internet users as percentage of population, Life expectancy, Military expenditure as percentage of GDP, Mortality rate, under 5, Population, and Population growth rate.

Without any doubt the list will grow, since World Bank has the largest database of economic and business indicators that has been collected for many decades from all over the world.

This is a huge step in data-openness and a wonderful example of how inter-linking open data sets can lead to some of the most interesting interfaces.

Irakli Nadareishvili