Chrome: maybe not all shiny

For those in the web services industry, Google’s entrance into the browser space is nerve-wracking. Things break. Plain and simple. Every new browser release means tens of thousands of users banging on pages/applications with a tool that wasn’t in existence when the page was built. I do not fear change and I am not a Google nay-sayer. But, I do think that when a company makes statements like “we wanted to build a browser ‘from scratch/ground up’” I cant help but be a little cynical.

For those in the web services industry, Google’s entrance into the browser space is nerve-wracking. Things break. Plain and simple. Every new browser release means tens of thousands of users banging on pages/applications with a tool that wasn’t in existence when the page was built. I do not fear change and I am not a Google nay-sayer. But, I do think that when a company makes statements like “we wanted to build a browser ‘from scratch/ground up’” I cant help but be a little cynical.

Google has a loud voice within the web spectrum, and there is bound to be people using the browser to navigate the web, who would probably be better served using a more stable release of an established browser like IE or FireFox. It’s important for people to understand the logic behind why Google has released a browser (and the inherent flaws that will come with such a massive early release.) And as they use Chrome and find things on sites that are broken, instead of decry either A) the browser itself or B) the website or application they are viewing, they should be patient. Most of these issues will be addressed as Chrome matures and developers understand it more.

 

Joel