AJAX as an adjective?

Did you know AJAX can be used as an adjective? I do, because I hear it a lot. Here are some typical comments from my clients and associates.

First, in its natural form, as a noun: “Mike, are you going to use AJAX on that?”

Now, as an adjective: “Mike, can you make that page ajaxy?”

And, as a verb: “Mike, are you going to ajax that page up?”

I’m still waiting on an adverb usage.

Mike Morris, EVP, Business Development and Marketing
#Development | Posted

Did you know AJAX can be used as an adjective? I do, because I hear it a lot. Here are some typical comments from my clients and associates.

First, in its natural form, as a noun: “Mike, are you going to use AJAX on that?”

Now, as an adjective: “Mike, can you make that page ajaxy?”

And, as a verb: “Mike, are you going to ajax that page up?”

I’m still waiting on an adverb usage. Maybe, “Mike, can you ajaxingly make that page really cool?”

Anyway, the concept of Asynchronous Javascript and XML has become so synonymous with making web pages “cool” that people talk about it without having any idea what it actually is or does. I guess it doesn’t matter.

Luckily, the popularity of AJAX has proliferated so quickly during this Web 2.0 era that a plethora of free tools and tricks are readily available for quick integration into any boring web page. One site I found very helpful is AJAX Rain. The site really does rain down thousands of AJAX and Javascript libraries and snippets for accomplishing just about anything you dream up. Go there for demos and downloads of free galleries, light boxes, drag & drop effects, and much, much more.

So the next time your client asks you to “ajax it up,” just smile and confidently reply “you got it!”

I’d love to hear from you. What are great resources you’ve found for web magic and trickery? Post a comment.

Mike Morris

EVP, Business Development and Marketing